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    You may not have a choice between whether you want gas appliances or electric ones, particularly if you are purchasing an older home. Consumers who are looking to build their own homes will want to investigate all of the options they have to make their home run most efficiently. Choosing between gas or electric heating systems will be one of the significant selections you are faced with.

    If you have a choice between these two heating systems, you should consider which one is right for your personal home. The differences between them could mean that one is better suited to your lifestyle, budget, and home better than the other.

    If you’ve been on the fence about whether a gas or electric heating system is right for you, this brief overview of both types will help you to make an educated decision.

    Upfront Investments

    For most homeowners, the cost is the biggest factor in making major decisions that will affect the future. Cost can apply to both the initial building budget as well as the maintenance costs of the unit. This is an unavoidable topic that must be discussed in relation to a gas or electric heating system.

    The largest advantage to selecting an electric heating system is the low initial cost to purchase the unit. They may range in price from $1,000 to $3,000 depending on the specific functions, warranties, and name brand that are important to you.

    In comparison, a gas furnace of a similar quality could cost anywhere from $2,000 to $4,000 to install. A strict building budget could make selecting an electric furnace the most obvious solution for your pressing need.

    Monthly Costs

    The initial investment isn’t the only cost that has to be considered. After all, your furnace plays a significant role in helping to heat your home and will be running quite often during the cold winter months. The monthly costs will vary between electric and gas heating systems, just as the upfront cost varied.

    While the electric furnace will be cheaper to purchase, it will ultimately cost more on your monthly heating bill. A gas furnace is an obvious choice for homeowners who want to lower their monthly costs. Across the country, most consumers report that the cost of natural gas is significantly lower than that of electricity.

    Homes that run their heaters almost constantly during the winter will quickly appreciate the hefty savings they may encounter.

    If you live in an area that is relatively warm year-round, the initial investment may be the only thing you have to consider. The monthly savings during cold months for a gas heater may not balance out the initial purchase if you don’t need to run it often. In this unique case, an electric heater would be the more prudent selection.

    Maintenance

    In addition to the cost of actually heating your home, each type of furnace will require a specific set of maintenance standards. Homeowners who are already in the habit of enlisting the help of a professional Air Conditioning company like Classic Air Conditioning and Heating to maintain their furnaces may not notice much difference between the two selections.

    It should be noted upfront that it’s imperative to have your gas furnace serviced annually.

    A gas furnace can pose a serious health risk to your family if it isn’t properly maintained. A small crack in the core pieces of the unit could allow harmful carbon monoxide fumes to leak into the surrounding area of your home. According to the CDC, carbon monoxide poisoning is responsible for approximately 20,000 emergency room visits each year.

    Even the smallest carbon monoxide leak can lead to health concerns that very closely mirror the flu. Left unchecked, carbon monoxide poisoning can lead to loss of consciousness and death.

    On the other hand, an electric furnace comes with none of these risks. While it’s still a wise investment to have a professional HVAC technician service your furnace annually, the risk of not doing so isn’t quite as high. If you know that you won’t keep up with the annual maintenance, an electric furnace may be a better option for your new home.

    Lifespan

    If you’re going to invest in a major appliance, you should know how long it is expected to last. This is a crucial piece of information that should be factored into your purchase as you weigh the cost of both the gas and the electric heating system.

    An electric furnace is likely to have the longer lifespan, with many units ranging in age from twenty to thirty years. The unit is less expensive initially and lasts significantly longer than its gas counterpart. As a result, the annual cost of the appliance comes out to be substantially lower than the gas version.

    A gas furnace is likely to last only twenty years at the most, with many units reaching the end of their lifespan at just ten to fifteen years. The cost is much higher due to this shorter lifespan, but it could be offset by your monthly savings. You will need to consider how often you run your furnace during the winter to determine if the monthly cost savings are truly worth the initial investment and shorter lifespan.

    Installation

    Installing a new heating system in your home should always be left to a professional. For the average homeowner, the process required to install a new furnace is more difficult than they may bargain for. Even if you don’t plan to install the new heating system on your own, you should know which of these systems is going to be more difficult to install because it can mean a higher bill from your HVAC company.

    An electric heater is easier to install because it lacks the safety requirements necessary for a gas furnace. There are relatively few requirements that a contractor must meet in order to install an electric furnace safely. For example, they may need heavy duty wiring but they won’t have to hook up pipes to vent air to the outdoors.

    Gas furnaces inherently have more safety risks. An installer must inspect each piece to ensure that no damage was done during transit. The heat exchanger can’t have even a minor crack in it or there could be a large carbon monoxide leak. You will need special tools, knowledge, and experience to hook up a gas furnace properly and efficiently.

    Effectiveness

    Does an electric furnace heat up your home better than a gas furnace? For some homeowners, money may be no object when it comes to building the home of their dreams. They really want to make a wise investment of their resources to purchase the unit that will most effectively heat their home during the coldest winter months. You should take some time to evaluate which of these options is truly right for you.

    A gas furnace is going to heat your home up significantly faster than an electric furnace. Once the burners start running, the gas furnace is automatically ready to start outputting plenty of heat. This heat is transferred to the living spaces of your home rapidly and warms them much faster than an electric version.

    Electric heaters will have to warm up their heating element before they’re ready to force hot air into the rest of your home. This can take some time, even if you turn the thermostat up to help speed up the process. If your primary concern is to heat up your home effectively during bitter cold spells, an electric heater isn’t going to be the way to go.

    Ultimately, you will have plenty of options for installing an effective heating system in your new home. Gas and electric heating systems both have some advantage that makes them appealing to homeowners and HVAC professionals alike. Determining which unit is going to be the right fit for your home is still a tricky endeavor.

    Consider the needs of your home and how much heat you will need during the winter based on your location. You may find that it is an obvious choice which type of heating unit your new home may require. Contact your local HVAC company to help walk you through the decision-making process for your new construction home.